How to Reflect on Your New Year's Resolution as Type 2 Diabetic

Are you making a New Year's resolution? Every year, millions of individuals set New Year's goals in the hopes of making a good difference in their ...

Are you making a New Year's resolution? Every year, millions of individuals set New Year's goals in the hopes of making a good difference in their lives. Even with the best of intentions, many individuals find it difficult to follow through on their resolutions once the excitement of a New Year wears off. Only 46% of those who set New Year's resolutions succeeded, according to research published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology. More than half of all resolutions fail, but you don't have to be one of them this year. 

Instead of running to the gym or library the moment you wake up on New Year's Day, don’t you feel it is more beneficial to reflect on the previous year and ask yourself why things went the way they did. "Was I kind to others this year?" you might wonder. Is it possible that I didn't spend enough time with my family and friends? Did I put forth a lot of effort this year? Was I able to maintain a good work-life balance? "Am I pleased with myself?"

Self-improvement does not have to be limited to the start of a new year. Just because there's a new number at the end of the current date doesn't indicate it's time for a major shift. Whether it's January, April, or October, if you want to change, make it happen. If you are unhappy with and desire to improve, try to improve, no matter how little.

Although the start of a new year is a significant turning point, there should not be any pressure to make such pledges on that day, only to violate them several weeks later.

I believe that modifying minor areas of your life throughout the year to get a positive overall outcome will help generate a greater overall influence by the end of the year. It may seem meaningless, but reflecting on these small adjustments and all the good things that have happened may be more beneficial than pointing out every negative event that has occurred and establishing unreasonable demands.

Getting Started

Do you need some assistance in coming up with some outstanding reflection questions? To start, I ask myself two questions and attempt to come up with at least six or eight responses for each:

What went particularly nicely this year?

What didn't go as planned this year?

I'm primarily interested in situations that I have influence over for these replies. It doesn't need to be on the list if anything went wrong that I couldn't avoid or control.

Continue with our list of 30 questions to help you reflect on the past year:

What was your most significant accomplishment this year?

What was the most significant objective you didn't accomplish this year but still want to accomplish next year?

What fitness objectives did you achieve this year?

What professional goals did you achieve this year?

What relationship objectives did you achieve this year?

What new abilities have you gained this year?

What were your worst blunders this year, and what did you learn from them?

This year, what hurdles or problems did you overcome?

As a result of this situation, what did you learn about yourself?

What did you discover about other people?

What was the most enjoyable experience you had this year?

What was your favorite moment from the last 12 months?

What was your biggest disappointment or regret this year?

What has been your year's most exciting new purchase?

What purchase did you have the greatest remorse over this year?

This year, what new beneficial habit did you start?

What bad habit did you give up this year?

What was one instance this year when you spoke up for something you believed in?

What would you alter about this year if you had the chance?

What was the most terrifying experience you had this year?

What was the most exciting thing you accomplished this year?

This year, how did you grow emotionally?

How did your physical well-being do this year?

What was your financial situation like this year?

How much have you progressed spiritually this year?

This year, how did you give back to your community?

This year, what did you spend the most time doing?

What do you wish you could have done more this year?

This year, how did you step outside of your comfort zone?

What have you been thankful for the most this year?

Last Year's Results

Next, evaluate the goals you made last year and write about them. Is it true that I met my objective or not? For whatever reason, it is generally normal to fall short of a few goals. Circumstances may change, and the purpose may become irrelevant. Of course, there are instances when you just fall short. It can be confusing because certain goals might be accomplished quickly while others become meaningless as the year progresses.

Think about the next year

After that, start thinking about the future. In the spirit of ensuring you stick to your New Year's resolution, here are a few pointers to get you started.

  • Be realistic — be honest with yourself and have someone you trust to assess your objectives to ensure that they are attainable. Put yourself in a position to succeed. Setting a marathon goal if you're new to running and generally out of shape may be impractical. In the beginning, set a goal of running two miles three times each week.

  • Break it down - what are the small steps you'll need to take to achieve your ultimate goal? The more stages you can sketch out and specify in precise terms, the better. Scaling the steps necessary to get to your final objective can help you gain momentum and celebrate minor victories along the road.

  • Break it down - what are the small steps you'll need to take to achieve your ultimate goal? The more stages you can sketch out and specify in precise terms, the better. Scaling the steps necessary to get to your final objective can help you gain momentum and celebrate minor victories along the road.

Finally, regardless matter how modest or huge your successes are, remember to give yourself credit along the way. You don't have to wait until you've completed your goals in their entirety to feel successful.